Teaching

Job description. (Photo: Sophie Batchelor)

Job description. (Photo: Sophie Batchelor)

My teaching interests are broad, including philosophy of mind and cognitive science, general philosophy of science, critical thinking and philosophical methodology, and social philosophy. I design my courses around transferable skills that can benefit students with diverse interests, such as critical science literacy, and engagement with topics that have theoretical and ethical significance to daily life. I take philosophy education (and humanities education, more generally) to be an indispensable component of a liberal arts education, and the education of informed and critical citizens. I strive to serve that mission in my teaching.

My course designs focus on developing philosophical skills that can be applied to many contexts, and are informed by my knowledge of empirical literature on psychology and education. My general approach is shaped by the slogan: Philosophy is hard, but worth learning to do well. Since it’s hard, I strive to make my expectations as explicit as possible, and give my students opportunities to fail productively and safely before they learn to succeed. For example, I’m a fan of mastery-based assessment. I plan my lessons around forms of guided practice, designed to be effective for students with diverse backgrounds and levels of interest, including those who face special challenges in the academy.

In the “Teaching” section of this website, I'm collecting some general resources for philosophy students. I also post materials for my current students, and archive materials from past courses.